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Construction Workers Dug A Trench In Spain And Discovered A Trove Of Priceless Roman Treasure

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Construction workers in Tomares, a town in Seville province in Spain, took to working like they would on any other day. Their task was to dig a ditch so they could install electricity to a park. However, when they begun to dig, they hit upon something that clearly was not soil. They immediately stopped working, as they did not want to break anything that such as cables or metal that they were not expecting. However, when they stopped digging and went to investigate, both they and the world would be shocked at what they found.

estaticos.efe.com

estaticos.efe.com

When they took a look down in the trench they were working on, they found 19 amphora. Amphoras are a type of Roman jug. The jugs itself were both huge and heavy and would have been an amazing archeological and historical find on their own. Unfortunately, due to the drilling, 10 of the 19 were broken. But thanks to the broken jugs, they were able to look down and see coins. They did not realize it at the time, but all total, the jugs contained more than 1300 pounds of bronze Roman coins. These coins dated back to the 3rd century, evident by the inscriptions of emperors Maximian and Constantine, meaning they had been stuck under the ground for thousands of years. And judging by the condition and the lack of wear on the coins, it is believed that they were new coins, not circulated coins.
It took quite a lot of digging and manpower, but all of the amphoras and coins that were visible were unearthed. After historians had a look at everything, they have stated it is all authentic and they do believe it has been buried all of this time. They also believe that there is at least one complete set of coins that was contained in the jugs.

After news broke of the story, both the townspeople and historians began to wonder how so many Roman coins had found their way to Spain. Obviously, it is unknown the exact reason, but your average person would have never had this many coins in their possession. And it took more than a couple of strong construction workers to lift each jug, and there were over 19, so this was not one person’s individual treasure stash. As such, it is theorized that these coins were to be given by the Spanish government to the Romans for some sort of payment, possibly taxes or to pay army or civil servants. However, how they came to be buried is unknown. There could have been a sudden flood or mudslide that buried the treasure.

abc.net.au

abc.net.au

At this time, the value of the collection has not been made public, but it is estimated to be worth several million Euros. All construction in the area has been halted and archeological teams have been brought in to further excavate the area in hopes of finding more treasure or clues as to why this was buried where it was.

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